Category: Art Activism

I AM NOT THE ENEMY

I Am Not The Enemy - Poster by Mark Vallen ©

Poster by Mark Vallen ©

I Am Not The Enemy
Free downloadable, 11 x 17 poster.

Download and publish the poster on any printer that takes 11 x 17 inch paper. Poster available here.

Print and display this poster for solidarity, unity, and compassion, and to express your opposition to xenophobia, and racism.

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I first published this poster in the weeks following the heinous terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, when thousands of hate crimes directed at Muslim Americans, or those thought to be Arabs, were occurring across the United States. Some of those attacks resulted in murder.

It was the case of Balbir Singh Sodhi that drove me to create my pencil on paper drawing, which I then published as a poster against hate crimes. Mr. Sodhi, a turban-wearing Sikh and proprietor of a gas station in Mesa, Arizona, was gunned down by a “patriot” that hours before, had bragged in a bar about wanting to “kill the ragheads responsible for September 11.” That murderer now sits on death row, but the racist xenophobia that motivated him is alive and growing in the United States, where anti-Muslim hatred and incitement has reached a boiling point.

On the afternoon of February 10, 2015, three young Muslims, twenty-three-year-old Deah Shaddy Barakat, his twenty-one-year-old wife Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, and her 19-year-old sister Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha, were found murdered in their home in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. A 46-year old white man was arrested as the suspected killer.

Deah Shaddy Barakat and Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha had been married for just a month. Deah was a dental student that organized free dental care for the homeless of Durham, North Carolina. He was also raising money to provide free dental care to refugee children in Turkey fleeing the devastating war in Syria. His wife Yusor was a talented artist and videographer. Her sister Razan did fundraising for a charity group that helped deaf Muslims.

It took days for the U.S. press to notice the killings while the twitterverse exploded with horror and outrage, lambasting the media for its almost non-existent coverage of the murders. Downplaying the possibility of a hate crime, the press has been reporting that the shooter might have killed the three over an argument concerning a parking space. But the unarmed students were found in their apartment, each with a bullet hole neatly placed in their heads. That was not an argument over parking… that was an assassination. I am deeply concerned that the media hems and haws over whether or not the killer was angry over a parking space or was actually motivated by a hatred of Muslims. I cannot image the horror and alarm Muslim Americans must feel at this moment.

The murder of the three young Muslims has become an international incident. United Nations spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric said: “At a time of troubling tensions stoked by those who seek to twist the teachings of faith and sow division, these three young people represented the best values of global citizenship and active community compassion to build a better world for all.”

On Feb. 11, 2015, at a daily briefing with the White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest, a reporter asked a question regarding the killing of the students, “Does the White House have any reaction?,” to which Earnest responded, “There’s no specific reaction from the White House.

On Feb. 12, 2015, U.S. ally President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, sharply criticized President Obama for his “telling” silence over the murders. Erdogan remarked: “If you stay silent when faced with an incident like this, and don’t make a statement, the world will stay silent towards you. As politicians, we are responsible for everything that happens in our countries and we have to show our positions.” Erdogan chided, “I ask Mr. Obama, where are you, Mr. President?”

After mounting criticism, Obama finally made a short statement on Feb. 13, 2015. The president said the killings were “brutal and outrageous,” and that “No one in the United States of America should ever be targeted because of who they are, what they look like, or how they worship.” That those words sound refreshing in “the land of the free” should tell you just how deep the crisis of American democracy has become.

While Obama’s words were certainly true, they also smacked of hypocrisy. The president targets people outside of the U.S. for “what they look like, or how they worship.” In five years of his drone attacks on Pakistan, 2,400 people have been blown-up by drone fired hellfire missles. While the majority of fatalities were suffered by terrorists, an estimated 951 innocent civilians were also killed, including up to 200 children. You might say that the victims of the Nobel Peace Prize Laureate were simply “collatoral damage,” but I suggest you take that up with their parents.

I do not know what more I can say. I will let my 2001 poster do the talking for me.

L.A. Mexican Consulate: Jan. 2015

Protest in front of the Los Angeles Mexican Consulate-General, Jan. 2015 - Photograph Mark Vallen 2015 ©

Protest at the Los Angeles Mexican Consulate-General, Jan. 2015. Photograph Mark Vallen 2015 ©

In Mexico and around the world, January 6, 2015 became an international day of solidarity with the parents of the missing students from the Ayotzinapa rural teachers college in Iguala, Mexico.

Vigils and protests took place all across Mexico, as well as in 20 U.S. cities. On the evening of Tuesday Jan. 6, 2015, up to 70 protesters in Los Angeles, California gathered outside of the Mexican Consulate-General across the street from L.A.’s historic MacArthur Park. My poster, Ayotzinapa Somos Todos, played a small role in the significant demonstration. You can view an article and photo essay about the demonstration that I have uploaded on my PATREON website, where you can also become my patron and directly assist in making such poster projects possible.

Twittering Like A Bird

Detail of hummingbirds from Diego Rivera’s remarkable 1947 oil painting, "Portrait of Linda Christian."

Detail of hummingbirds from Diego Rivera’s remarkable 1947 oil painting, "Portrait of Linda Christian."

I have an aversion to the Orwellian truncation and mangling of English words and their meanings. Last year Lake Superior State University came up their 40th annual list of words that should be banished for their mis-use or uselessness; words like swag, foodie, curate, and enhanced interrogation. I would like to add to that list the words twitter and tweet.

As a lover of the avian world and a keen bird watcher, I know that tweeting is something birds do. Nope, you can’t fool me.

Up until just recently, to say that  someone was “twittering like a bird” meant that they were inanely chattering about trivial matters. That does not sound like me, so I am certain many will be surprised that I have finally made the giant leap into the micro-blogging Twitterverse.

twitter.com/mark_vallen

Now, instead of long-winded rants and essays, I have to learn how to express myself with twitter-speak, 140 characters sprinkled with # and @ signs. Heavens above, Pablo Neruda sheds a tear!

Although Twitter has been in existence since 2006, I must admit to not appreciating its potential until just a while ago. Specifically it was the mass protests in Mexico over the missing 43 students from Ayotzinapa Normal School, and how Mexicans were using Twitter in response, that finally woke me up and won me over.

As is almost always the case when it comes to the truly important news of the day, I was completely frustrated by the near total lack of coverage the Ayotzinapa crisis in Mexico was receiving, not just from the mainstream media as I would expect, but also from the so-called “progressive/activist” news outlets as well.

Undaunted, I turned to Twitter, and saw how the students, activists, workers, and protesters of Mexico were using the micro-blogging platform to spread their drive for true democracy, exchange images and ideas, create dissident culture, coordinate actions, and so much more. Not only that, people around the world were joining them; I wanted to jump into the fray myself, and the only way I could do that was by creating my own Twitter account.

I look forward to using the platform to post announcements of artistic happenings, as well as news and links I find interesting as I research my writing projects; spreading the Art for a Change message to a larger international audience. I promise not to “twitter like a bird” over celebrity superstars and their lifestyles.

Whether you are already a Twitter user, or have been perched on the fence about joining - I invite you to connect with me on the Twittersphere. Please visit https://twitter.com/mark_vallen and click the “Follow” button to receive regular updates!

Art For A Change Patreon Project

“A true friend is someone who lets you have total freedom to be yourself”
- Jim Morrison *

Dear Friends and Associates old and new. I have splendid plans for the Art For a Change project in this unfolding New Year, and I need a little bit of your help to make them come true.

Recently I found out about a new website platform called PATREON, which is pulling together a community of artists, photographers, writers, musicians, and all manner of creative people; it allows supporters to directly fund their favorite artists. Patreon is similar to an ongoing art grant, but one financed completely by the people!

This week, I have publicly launched the Art For A Change Patreon site, where you can directly support my art and writings. If you would like to know more about my Patreon campaign and perhaps lend your support, please visit:

www.patreon.com/markvallen

I am mindfully launching my Patreon campaign now because of an upcoming significant date for all Americans and the global community, January 19, 2015 - Martin Luther King Jr. Day. In his 1954 sermon Transformed Nonconformist, Dr. King uttered visionary words for the nascent political activists of his day that were also amazingly applicable to the artists of the present. As a teenager in the late 1960s, when I read King’s advocacy of “creative maladjustment,” I suddenly understood the path I would take in life. As both an artist and an activist, Dr. King’s words hold special meaning for me:

“This hour in history needs a dedicated circle of transformed nonconformists. Our planet teeters on the brink of atomic annihilation: dangerous passions of pride, hatred, and selfishness are enthroned in our lives: truth lies prostrate on the rugged hills of nameless calvaries: and men do reverence before false gods of nationalism and materialism. The saving of our world from pending doom will come, not through the complacent adjustment of the conforming majority, but through the creative maladjustment of a non-conforming minority.”

The scourges of racism, war, poverty, and severe inequality that Dr. King confronted still plague U.S. society and the world, recent mind-numbing events in the news are proof enough. But where are the creatively maladjusted that King spoke of? Clearly, the artists of today have not met the challenges of a world in crisis.

Banner from the "Art For A Change" Patreon page

Banner from the "Art For A Change" Patreon page

The Art For A Change project hopes to nurture and encourage the “non-conforming minority”… but it cannot be done without your support. I have been creating socially conscious art for my entire career - and I have written this blog for the last ten years - all entirely without any outside funding or art grants.

Patreon, meanwhile, allows creative people to receive regular monthly funding to support the imaginative things that they do. It provides a way for creative types to be compensated for their hard work, especially when it comes to work that is distributed online and often for free. The best part is, support can begin at just $1 per month! Plus, as part of an artist’s community on Patreon, supporters (patrons) can communicate with artists directly and get special updates on their work!

Today’s admission prices to any of the major museums in the U.S., can run anywhere from $15 to $25 dollars per person; the entrance fee for two individuals attending a “special” exhibit at a museum is commonly $50. In the first half of 2014, Christie’s auction house sold $4.5 billion worth of overpriced artworks to society’s 1%. None of that has anything to do with making art accessible to the 99%, or helping the great majority of working artists in the U.S. to survive. It is time that artists and their enthusiasts take another path; by means of Patreon, the public now has a new ability to help directly shape the art world.

I am excited to see what we can collectively accomplish in the months to come. Many of you have followed my works for years, some of you have just discovered this web log. I greatly appreciate that you find value in what I do, perhaps as much as I enjoy painting, drawing, and writing about art on this blog. Together, with your generous support, we can do so much more!

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* The quote from Jim Morrison came from an interview with him conducted for Creem Magazine by Lizzie James in 1970. Morrison died in 1971 at the age of 27. Creem Magazine published the interview in 1981 on the anniversary of Morrison’s death.